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1 Last Will and Testament

A will is a legal declaration where a person, the testator, names one or more people to manage his or her estate and provides for the transfer of his or her property at death.

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2 General Power of Attorney

A power of attorney authorizes another person to act on your behalf in legal or business matters. Use this document to give authorization to another to act on your behalf. This document is meant to give broad power to the authorized person. The authority given is to manage and conduct all affairs and to exercise all legal rights and powers, including all rights and powers that may be acquired in the future. If you desire to give more specific powers, the Power of Attorney (limited/specific) is most likely the more appropriate document.

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3 Power of Attorney (limited/specific)

A power of attorney authorizes another person to act on your behalf in legal, medical or business matters. Use this document to authorize someone to act on your behalf in matters which you are given the opportunity to specify.

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4 Power of Attorney for Health Care and Living Will

A Power of Attorney for Health Care Living Will is a very important legal document that allows you to designate a person (an agent) to make health care decisions on your behalf upon your incapacity as you specify within the document. It allows you to give instructions as to whether you would like to receive life sustaining treatment upon your incapacity. Your incapacity is determined by two (2) physicians stating in writing that you are unable to make health care decisions on your own.

A Power of Attorney for Health Care Living Will differs from a basic Living Will in that it allows a person to name an agent to make decisions on his or her behalf wherein a basic Living Will merely allows a person to state their wishes and desires regarding health care decisions.

Additionally, this document contains a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) waiver. The HIPAA waiver states that the specific people you name can communicate with medical personnel about your condition.

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5 Designation of Guardians and Durable Power of Attorney

This document allows you to nominate a person to act as guardian of the person of your minor child(ren). A guardian of the person is an individual who is legally responsible for the personal affairs, health and well-being of a minor. The guardian of the person will have the authority to make decisions on behalf of your minor children when you are unable to do so.

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6 Living Will

A Living Will is a very important legal document that allows you to state your wishes and desires regarding health care treatment before you are unable to do so on your own. It allows you to give instructions as to what types of life-sustaining treatment you would like to receive upon your incapacity.

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7 Caregiver Consent for Medical Treatment

This document authorizes a temporary caregiver to make emergency medical decisions for your child in your absence, authorizes medical professionals to provide emergency medical care for your child until you can be reached, provides vital medical information about your child to healthcare providers, and lists contact information for you and your child's normal healthcare providers.

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8 Revocation of Power of Attorney

A power of attorney authorizes another person to act on your behalf in legal or business matters. If you have already given someone power of attorney over your matters but have since then decided to revoke power from that person it will be necessary to do so in writing and have it authorized by a notary public. Use this document to revoke power of attorney from a previously authorized person.

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